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Wasting Water? H2-No

Sonia Rao, Staff Writer

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Americans take a lot of things for granted, and water is one of them.  Every day, the average American family of four uses about 400 gallons of water for tasks that most of us don’t even think about, such as showering and brushing our teeth.  World Water Day, a nationally recognized event on March 22nd, 2017, is a day meant to acknowledge how many people don’t have the privilege of water in their lives.  A couple days ago was a day dedicated to overcoming the world water crisis and reminding the world of how precious clean drinking and bathing water is.  Right now, about 1.8 billion people’s water is contaminated with feces and other bad chemicals and pollutants.  Drinking dirty water puts people at risk for diseases such as cholera, dysentery, and typhoid- but sometimes, people have no choice but to drink the only water available to them.  By 2040, it is estimated that one in every four children will be living with water scarcity.  

World Water Day was created by the UN in 1993 to bring more awareness to the situation.  However, throughout the years, it seems that our water problem has only gotten worse, and Americans are still not aware of the true problem- or rather, they just don’t care.  Even with situations such as the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan and the day-long drought in Chapel Hill, people are not taking necessary measures to conserve our water.

The theme of this year’s Water Day is Wastewater, focusing on reducing and reusing the water in our homes instead of wasting it. The majority of wastewater from our homes and cities goes back to the environment polluted and harmful.  So this year, the UN wants us to focus on water-conserving techniques such as treating and reusing city wastewater, treating and recycling discharge from industry and agriculture cooling systems and irrigation, and reusing greywater on our home gardens and land. Even the little acts count- turning the sink off when you’re brushing your teeth, taking shorter showers, using water-conserving showerheads, etc.  

The fact is, clean water is one of the most precious commodities on our planet, but it is not treated as such.  We constantly waste the resource that we are so lucky to have.  And even if you don’t think that it is possible to make a big difference by taking a few simple steps, you are wrong.  Billions of tiny raindrops together will eventually make an ocean.  Together we are trying to make an ocean of clean, reusable water that 1.8 billion people in the world do not have access too.  

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The Official Student News of Green Hope High School
Wasting Water? H2-No