The Green Hope Falcon

Daylight Saving: Good or Bad?

Coral Aman, Copy Editor

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This weekend marked the 100th anniversary of “fall back” that was started by the Englishman William Willett. Germany was the first country to enact daylight saving time, and the United States joined the bandwagon. However, not all states in the U.S. take part in “spring forward” or “fall back.” Both Arizona and Hawaii chose not to participate in daylight saving. In fact, only about one-quarter of the world population sets their clocks back or forward each year.

 

Here in North Carolina, we all set our clocks back once again. It may be lighter outside in the mornings, but the days will begin to feel shorter, as the sun now sets around five. Although it’s exciting to gain an extra hour of sleep, how does this time change really impact us?

 

“Fall back” impacts our circadian rhythm or our body’s natural clock. Whether you gain or lose an hour of sleep, this greatly affects your sleep pattern. It can take five to seven days for this pattern to return to normal. While we may look forward to an hour of extra sleep, most people find themselves less productive after the time change.

 

The absence of light may cause excessive irritability, sleepiness, or difficulty concentrating. Studies have shown that time change is related to an increase in traffic accidents due to tiredness. Setting our clocks back can also have a greater impact on us as students because we often do not get enough sleep as it is. Green Hope sophomore, Uma Bhat, explained how the time change has impacted her: “I definitely feel more lethargic due to “fall back,” it’s something you have to get used to.” If you are feeling tired an hour earlier than usual this week, you can blame it on “fall back.”

 

If you find yourself impacted with tiredness by this time change, don’t surrender to sleep. Try going to bed fifteen minutes early each day until you feel less tired. Another solution is to get outside! Light can reduce the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. Go for a walk, or take your homework outside. The more Vitamin D you can expose yourself to, the better you will feel! Also, avoid bright light when you are trying to fall asleep. Turn off your phone, or at least lower the brightness, and avoid using any other bright lights.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

About the Writer
Coral Aman, Copy Editor

Coral is a senior this year and it’s her second year taking the Falcon News Feed class. When she’s not running in the Cross Country or Track seasons, Coral enjoys spending time at the beach and even says if she had to live anywhere outside of the United States it would probably be a tropical island somewhere. Christmas is one of the best times of the year according to Coral; decorating and putting up the tree is her favorite family tradition. Many seniors get anxious to leave Green Hope and Cary, and Coral is no exception. Although she’s a little scared to leave everything she’s ever known, this senior also can’t wait to meet new people and have new experiences; she’s just hoping she doesn’t get senioritis as graduation nears! In the future, Coral hopes to see herself working as an occupational therapist and helping others with basics everyday things, or participating in scientific research, which makes perfect sense seeing as science and math are her two favorite subjects in school.

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Daylight Saving: Good or Bad?