The Falcon News Feed

From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Green Hope

For it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done forever- Thoreau

Deb+%28L%29+and+Megan++%28R%29+both+attended+Marjory+Stoneman+Douglas+High+School+and+go+to+Green+Hope.
Deb (L) and Megan  (R) both attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and go to Green Hope.

Deb (L) and Megan (R) both attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and go to Green Hope.

Justin Sprink

Justin Sprink

Deb (L) and Megan (R) both attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and go to Green Hope.

Zara Khan, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On February 20th, six days after the Parkland shooting, the Falcon News Feed met with two juniors, Deb and Megan. No one really knew much about them. But after about a minute or two, our whole classroom felt the gravity of the shootings in Parkland, Florida. 

Deb and Megan both moved here from Parkland, Florida. They attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. They knew students, teachers, and staff affected.

They shared their stories. We listened.

Another student, Reagan Dovel, had just published a piece in the News & Observer about the tragedy, she shared her story and her fears as well.

Principal Summers listened intently and she said something that I will not forget. She counseled us that one way or another this shooting impacted all of us, the student body of Green Hope High School as a whole, whether it be direct, or indirect.

Immediately the room began to flow with ideas and we partnered with the student council to coordinate a walkout. All marches, walkouts all together take some form of planning. Permits need to be acquired, spaces to be decided, speakers to be arranged. After news of the walkout began to spread, some students shrugged that this was not an “act of civil disobedience.” A walkout as defined by Merriam-Webster is “the action of leaving a meeting or organization as an expression of disapproval.” Instead, this is not a walkout against the administration. Rather, we are coming together as students of Green Hope High School and standing with fellow students across the country to demand an end to gun violence in our schools.  For Civil disobedience, according to Henry David Thoreau,  “it matters not how small the beginning may seem to be: what is once well done is done forever.” 

These are the stories of two Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students.

Megan Sharma remembers her group chat began flooding with messages. Then her heart started sinking. She got home at 2:30 pm from Green Hope just about the time of the shooting at her former school started happening. Sharma recalls reading that her close-knit group of friends from Florida was trying to coordinate how and where to meet; find their loved ones. eep each other safe.

Megan began contacting people she hadn’t talked to in a long time, trying to make sense of what just happened. It didn’t hit her until the next day. The Green Hope counselors were supportive. Sharma didn’t expect the overwhelming support she received, the gratitude of people was almost overwhelming. She saw the community of Parkland come together for vigils, protests aimed at making a difference.

This gave her hope.

The thought of the shooting is still raw. It trickles through her mind at times. She has lost her sense of safety- anywhere. “People need to be super aware at all times; this kind of thing can happen anywhere. If you see signs that someone is going through something, acting out, or not being themselves, take action,” she says.

We need empathy, empathy, empathy.”

— Debarpita Bhattacharya

Sharma also wants change, and just like her former classmates at Stoneman she wants it now. “These walkouts are the start of something big, a movement that the history books will remember- if they are done correctly!” Megan exclaims. She encourages us all to walk, but only if we are standing up for something that we believe. Only if we want change.

Debarpita Bhattacharya’s father forwarded a text to Deb. Two fatalities so far. With that, it became so real and personal. She opened her Snapchat and saw the horror, “people were posting on their stories, hiding under desks with gunshots firing in the back.” Valuing life and safety over everything else has become essential to Bhattacharya’s beliefs.

Deb holds her loved ones even closer as she knows that things like this can happen- anywhere. “We need empathy, empathy, empathy,” she repeats over and over.

Deb sees the light at the end of the tunnel, however, when she sees events like the CNN Town Hall and discussions on both sides about gun violence. “We’re young, we have the power to do something. People are lobbying in Florida right now,” she reflects hopefully.

Deb feels the Green Hope walkout is for awareness, to come together as a community to acknowledge the fact that something needs to be done. “It’s like a chain of events leading to a drive, push, or campaign for students across the U.S.,” Deb adds.

Funny thing is, Megan and Deb actually had classes together in Parkland. They didn’t know each other.

Now they live on the same street and are inextricably linked and forever united.

For Deb and Megan, this is the beginning of a discussion.

For us, this is the beginning of a movement.

 

Leave a Comment

Let your voice be heard.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Green Hope

    #whyGHwalks

    It Happened. Again.

  • From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Green Hope

    #whyGHwalks

    Photos of the Green Hope Walkout

  • #whyGHwalks

    To Walk Out or Not to Walk Out?

  • From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Green Hope

    #whyGHwalks

    Walkout Video – 2/28/18

  • From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Green Hope

    #whyGHwalks

    Green Hope Walks Out

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Official Student News of Green Hope High School
From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Green Hope